Dragon Portals

Finally, a game that at least attempts at treating the glorious dragon race with some respect, without trying to give them a cute, endearing personality. These dragons are still strange, but at least not insulting. My newly formed Dragon Preservation Society is going to put this in its list of approved entertainment. Not only are the dragons true to their (Chinese) origins, but the actual game (Dragon Portals) is also great!

There is a story mode, which tells about a girl from the modern time, who suddenly finds herself in the ancient China.

Dragon Portals is a very standard puzzle with some very unique mechanics. There is a story mode, which tells about a girl from the modern time, who suddenly finds herself in the ancient China. Not only is it ancient, there is plenty of magic, as well. The first old, bearded Chinese dude she meets, comes into her bedroom and tells her that she’s a chosen one, who needs to unleash his great lap dragon who has a great ability to spew-w-wait a second, that’s an intro to one of my stories, actually, disregard this. Carry on! The old Chinese dude does come into her apartment but he tells her that all of the dragons are leashed by dark forces, which manifest themselves into gems on their bodies, stop laughing, I mean actual, coloured gems. Anyway, she needs to free the dragons from their gems with some sort of power. Magic. Whatever, by this point I was thinking about this anime about the powerful dude with big, long hair and over 900 points of his spiritual power, I can’t really remember its name, though. The story doesn’t really have that much impact on the gameplay, although it really is a nice addition. Every game level consists of four dragons, (read: horizontal stripes), flying one over the other, each of them having a number of differently coloured gems in a single line throughout their bodies.

It’s all very complicated on paper, and it actually sort of is, not because it’s difficult to understand the concept, but because the game is quite unusual.

You can touch their gems to make them drop to another dragon, below them or simply outside if the dragon is at the bottom. The goal is as always, to let three or more gems of the same colour touch, to remove them from the dragon. After this, new gems are taking their place rolling from the dragon’s tail and the process continues until you lose or win, if there’s such an option. You can only change the ball’s position downwards and only if by moving it, you’ll destroy some of the gems in either of two lines. It’s all very complicated on paper, and it actually sort of is, not because it’s difficult to understand the concept, but because the game is quite unusual. Although it reminds distantly of Zuma and the like, the game is demanding a whole other amount of skills, which I actually never acquired, so I had to pick them up on the go, by the way, the game isn’t that easy. The catch is that dragons are constantly falling to the ground, a process that can only be stopped briefly by removing the gems. Wrapping up, the game is greatly enjoyable and has a lot of different stuff that varies the gameplay, like power-ups, different game modes, and even a couple of mini-games. Overall, although I prefer for these games to have a slightly lower price, Dragon Portals really manages to make up for it with its challenging and unique gameplay.