Dungeon Plunder

Like every sane individual, I stay as far away from slot machines as possible, because like every sane individual, I know that once I put that quarter inside, I stop being a sane individual and become a greedy idiot with too much money on my hands. Slot machines are a great example of our primitive, monkey brains, not grasping the basic concept of random numbers, or, in case of digital ones, an illusion of it, and thus, provide an endless supply of joy, just like Dungeon Plunder, a game that is 50% rogue-like RPG and 50% slot machine itself, without the risk of losing your salary, of course.

When you encounter the enemy, the game switches to the second, battle screen, and that’s where the slot machine part comes in.

When starting the game, you should first choose one of the three heroes that you’re going to play as, each one of them having unique play styles and abilities. They are a warrior, a mage and a rogue. Dungeon Plunder consists of two main screens: a map, where you go around a global map, square by square, with your goal being somewhere far ahead. Your task is, as always, destroy evil thing that’s threatening everything, this time it’s a rogue warlock and his magical ball. In any case, you need to go around a map and engage various enemies, collect the treasures and money they are protecting and visit houses to get experience and money for killing certain monsters, as well as spend money to purchase new equipment. By the way, although there is a wide range of various items to wear, I almost never checked it for the better items are automatically equipped, quite a nice thing, I must say. When you encounter the enemy, the game switches to the second, battle screen, and that’s where the slot machine part comes in. You see, the battle screen actually, IS a slot machine. Your turn consists of rolling slot machine twice. Then your enemy attacks, if he is able, obviously, and you have another two rolls. There are several things that can be rolled on the slot machine, each one of them bearing some or no significance to different classes, so let’s take rogue as an example. He needs to roll two or more daggers on the slot machine to attack the enemy. His attack strength mostly depends on two things: his attack power, which you can upgrade when you level up, how many daggers there were rolled and how many poison bottles he has, which can also be rolled on the slot machine.

If you already have two daggers on the first move, you can lock them and reroll to have a chance to get more of them

The hands of fate are far from the only thing affecting your performance, though, for after you’ve rolled the first time, you can lock any of the five slots to stop it from changing on reroll. Thus, if you already have two daggers on the first move, you can lock them and reroll to have a chance to get more of them, and even if you don’t you’ll deal some damage still. As I said, each of the heroes has his own usable items he can roll out, but there are several universal ones. Coin icon gives you gold, depending on how many of them you rolled up, of course, shield icon gives your hero protection from damage and heart icon refills his health. Besides various differences, warlock has two different attack icons and mage’s power depends on how much mana he has stored, each of the heroes can also learn several special abilities. Rogue, for example, is able to change any icons he can’t use to some that he can, while warrior is able to go berserk and gain additional attack strength, in exchange for protection. The game is certainly a unique one, featuring an unusual, if a bit randomized, gameplay, which actually demands skillfulness more than one would think. You’re certainly going to die a lot, and speaking of which, you can’t save your character. The only consolation for your timely demise is going to be additional gold and, maybe, a chance to create a power-up for your next heroes. Although the game can seem like a repetitive one, it’s definitely a time-consuming process. I’ve held a firm belief that it’s a repetitive game throughout several hours I couldn’t stop playing it, so I guess it’s not that much an issue. Although Dungeon Plunder looks pretty boring on the outside, I assure you that it really is a lot of fun.